Emmanuel Holcombe PSHE vision

Intent 

The Education Act (2002) requires that we provide our children with a broad and balanced curriculum that meets the needs of all pupils. We know that Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education (SMSC) must be promoted  and that we have a duty of care to keep our pupils safe. “High quality, evidence-based and age-appropriate teaching of these subjects can help prepare pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life. They can also enable schools to promote the spiritual, moral, social, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils, at school and in society.” Department for Education (DfE)

 

Jigsaw holds children at its heart, and its cohesive vision helps children understand and value how they fit into and contribute to the world. With strong emphasis on emotional literacy, building resilience and nurturing mental and physical health, Jigsaw 3-11 properly equips schools to deliver engaging and relevant PSHE within a whole-school approach. Jigsaw lessons also include mindfulness allowing children to advance their emotional awareness, concentration and focus.

 

Implementation

Jigsaw 3-11 offers a comprehensive Programme for Primary PSHE including statutory Relationships and Health Education, in a spiral, progressive and fully planned scheme of work, giving children relevant learning experiences to help them navigate their world and to develop positive relationships with themselves and others.

Jigsaw consists of six half-term units of work (Puzzles), each containing six lessons (Pieces) covering each academic year.

  • Term 1: Being Me in My World

  • Term 2: Celebrating Difference (including anti-bullying)

  • Term 3: Dreams and Goals

  • Term 4: Healthy Me

  • Term 5: Relationships

  • Term 6: Changing Me (including Sex Education)

Every Piece has two Learning Intentions, one specific to Relationships and Health Education (PSHE) (in purple) and the other designed to develop emotional literacy and social skills (in green).

Puzzles are launched with a whole-school assembly containing an original song, with each year group studying the same unit at the same time (at their own level), building sequentially through the school year, facilitating whole-school learning themes.

The various teaching and learning activities are engaging and mindful of different learning styles and the need for differentiation and the Early Years (EYFS) planning is aligned to the National Early Years Framework (England).

Each lesson is built upon a Charter which underpins the behaviour and respect that is the basis for each lesson (one is provided within Jigsaw, but children and their teacher can write their own to ensure mutual respect and ownership).

The lessons then split into 6 parts, all of which should be included in every session to ensure that the learning follows the optimum

In addition to this, teachers have the freedom to plan with detail and attention to their individual children. Learners can be scaffolded, and any individual needs can be supported where necessary. The summative assessment process offers criteria for children either working  at, beyond or towards  the age-related expectations. Greater depth children can be challenged to ensure that they are being given the opportunities to enrich their learning further. The “Class Teacher” page at the start of every puzzle allows time for practitioners to consider the upcoming content. These support teachers to feel more confident in their own subject knowledge, which in turn allows them to extend the learning of the children.

Impact

 

As Jigsaw PSHE is a whole-school approach, rather than simply a lesson-a-week Scheme of Work for PSHE, there are numerous layers built in that engender a sense of belonging and community, and that value every individual, for example: praising one attitude or behaviour each week through the Weekly celebration, bringing the whole school together for Jigsaw assemblies and to sing the Jigsaw songs, and celebrating every child’s contribution to the school community through the ‘end of Puzzle outcome’ (a display or whole-school activity that includes everyone’s involvement or work). 

 

Assessment in Jigsaw is both formative and summative. The two clear learning objectives for each lesson (piece) allow the teacher to be mindful of the assessment elements within that session that can formatively help them pitch and plan subsequent lessons, and activities are included in each lesson to give the children the opportunity to self-assess using simple pictorial resources designed in a child-friendly, age appropriate manner. It also allows children of 6 and over the opportunity to identify areas for self-improvement.